On April 17, 2018, the Supreme Court issued Sessions v. Dimaya, and immigration case holding that a certain provision of federal law was so vague that it cannot be applied to determining the deportability of non-citizens. Headlines were screaming about how those rascally courts were immunizing violent criminals from deportation – even Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, who was supposed to be a “good guy” in the struggle to make American safe again. Of course what happened was nothing of…

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Over and over, the media reports of aliens fleeing violence in Latin America, predominantly Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador seeking asylum in the United States. Over and over the pretense is that a well-founded fear of persecution allows one to win an asylum claim and live in safety in the United States. Over and over, the facts and the law show this is not true, as I have written here and here and here and here and here. Certainly,…

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We all deal with backlogs. It may be dealing with an abstract list of lifetime goals, our bucket list, like visiting all 50 states, learning French, or, the more challenging, like getting through Ken Burns’ “Vietnam.” Then there are more mundane ambitions, like converting your CD collection to MP3’s, or reading that ever-growing pile of New Yorkers. The government has its backlog too. The one I have the most experience with is the backlog in immigration cases. There are three…

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San Diegans have been treated to a feel-good immigration story for the holidays as related here and here. According to the press reports, Marco Chavez, a 45 year old honorably discharged former U.S. Marine, who was convicted of a crime in 1998 and deported for it in 2002, returned to the United States with permission on December 21, 2017. As the news stories tell it, Mr. Chavez’s conviction was for animal animal cruelty involving a dog. The crime was construed…

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