Interpreting the impact of convictions on removal getting a whole lot simpler.

Sunday, June 23rd, 2013

It was getting real complicated there for a while. There was a time when it was not that hard to figure out if someone was removable for a crime. Let’s start with the basics. Non-citizens of the United States who commit crimes can be deported for them.  Consider a non-citizen, called an alien under immigration laws, who committed a crime. We’ll call him a Criminal Alien, or CA. CA is convicted of murder. When he is done with his prison…

Yet another look at Matter of Silva-Trevino, this time through a Rosas colored glasses.

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Today I write again on a technical matter, discussing the case, Matter of Silva-Trevino, again. As you may recall from writings  here and here  and here, in this case, the then-attorney general, Michael Mukasey, issued a decision deviating from the prevailing law regarding what an immigration judge may consider in determining whether someone committed a crime of moral turpitude. This is important because depending on the number of such crimes, when they were committed, and the severity of the sentence,…

Matter of Silva-Trevino: Going, going ….

Sunday, October 16th, 2011

On November 7, 2008, outgoing Attorney General Michael Mukasey turned immigration law on its head when he issued a decision, Matter of Silva-Trevino. Rather than go into all its details, I refer you to a blog I posted on it in January 2011 and an article I co-authored.  In January I optimistically forecasted that Matter of Silva-Trevino would not survive Ninth Circuit scrutiny. I wrote: This case (Rosas Castaneda v. Holder)  also may be foreshadow the demise of another precedent…